Saturday, August 15, 2015

The "Prove You're Psychic" - win a prize offers

So, throughout my time of watching Youtube videos, including from years ago and today being reminded in one video ----

there is a challenge offered by someone where if you can prove you have psychic ability, he'll give you 1 million dollars, and according to the video I watched today, no one has won the prize.

So: what do I think about this?

I have proven at home to my family and even over long distances to at least myself that I am capable of telepathic thought. I can send and receive messages with my mind.

The easiest way to test and prove this ability is just to read my family's minds.

So::: Where could a 1 million dollar psychic challenge go wrong for me?

First of, The Amazing Kreskin, the world's foremost mentalist doesn't consider it a psychic power, it's just science to him, he did apprentice as a psychologist you know ----

but also, I don't always get it right, for any number of reasons including maybe my personal lack of skill and even a possibility that the person I'm reading is being dishonest with me.

Today I did a telepathy test with my mom.

The very first reading was clear 'X'.  Then I got a 'Y'. But though I would have known according to sequence that Z would have been the last character, that's not what I read on her mind, so I ended up writing down "C" instead.

So, I wrote down: X Y C

What what her original?

Her original was: X T Z

From today's experiment alone, it is clear that I clearly read and understood the X properly, but this demonstration might have shown that she had dishonest thoughts, because though I was well aware of the sequence of X Y Z at the time of the reading, she may have thought Y when it was actually T, and I was supposed to get the Z from seeing the X and Y except she was thinking (maybe) C so, I would have known it was a Z, except she thought something different.

Basically, my parents have proven to me that they are very capable of being dishonest about what they are thinking, and today's example just happens to be a very good example of that.

On a side note, over a week ago (because I didn't do any experiments for a whole week) I know I was able to properly read both the letters E and F on my father's mind, and scored a 2/3.


Anyway, I can prove in home testing that I am capable of reading simple thoughts in a person's mind, but to get the 1 million dollar prize I'd have to not screw up while dealing with factors such as "dishonesty" and a lack of trust in the judge that wouldn't let me test with my own parents.

Basically, I have proven myself to my own parents at very least, but the conditions of the experiment might not work, as well as I might just lack the total skill to do as well as I'd want to.

I am somewhat capable, but that doesn't mean I'm excessively good or perfect.

I can keep it on my mind that there's always that test available --- but though I know I have some ability, it's not perfect yet.

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On a side note, it would be interesting if I did prove my psychic power and that's why Avril Lavigne started singing about me.

If I earned Avril Lavigne's friendship, respect and song for my previous accomplishments in life, I suppose you can imagine how ripped off I've felt in my life that she would be forcefully taken away from me by a corrupt A-Hole Bishop and doctors who can't let me believe in things which were already proven for decades.

Yes --- maybe I earned Avril, but she was stolen from me by people who don't care to let me achieve the reward of great past effort, the great past effort being anything ranging from being top of the class in school to having predicted 9/11. Or maybe i earned her from being on the verge of killing myself, which makes the idea that they took her from me absolutely horrible because she was helping me regain better mental health, and the bishop and psychiatrists I was dealing with, unfortunately, didn't seem to care that she really helped me.

It was all rotten I guess. Such a rip-off. They can't even let her comfort my tortured life apparently.

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